Exam Preparation Tips

Six Top GATE/ASET Test Reading Tips

posted Feb 13, 2019, 5:19 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Jul 13, 2019, 4:03 PM ]

Tip 1: Pay Attention to Connotation and Context

This tip is critical for answering tough questions in the Reading section. Look for words that indicate positive or negative connotation in the part of the passage that the question references. This can help you to eliminate at least a couple of choices even if you have no idea which of the remaining choices is correct.

Context is also very important! Do not just look at the exact line that is referenced in the question?alook at the sentences around it too. Look for contrast words such as 'however', 'rather than' or 'still'. You should also pay attention to strong adjectives that might help you to determine connotation.

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Tip 2: Use Find the Evidence Questions to Your Advantage

Some questions would ask you to choose an excerpt from the passage that serves as the best evidence for your answer to the previous question. These new questions can help you tremendously in identifying mistakes and clearing up ambiguities.

For example, say you have picked out two answers that you think could be correct for a reading question. If the next question asks you to identify the best evidence for your answer, you can read through all the options the find-the-evidence question gives you and see which choice most directly connects to one of your two potential responses for the previous question. In almost every case, it will become abundantly clear which of the two choices is correct because only that one will have a corresponding tidbit of direct evidence tucked away in one of the answer choices for the find the evidence question.

Tip 3: Read Passages Strategically

Try to nail down a good passage reading strategy for the GATE/ASET before test day. This will save you time and stress later. There are a few methods you might use depending on how comfortable you are with the test and where you are in your reading comprehension skills.

Method 1: Skim the Passage First

This is the method I would be most inclined to recommend. You can get a sense of the main ideas of the passage without wasting too much time reading it closely. To skim effectively, just read the introductory paragraph, conclusion paragraph, and first and last sentences of each body paragraph.

Answer main idea questions first while the overall point of the passage is still fresh in your mind. Then you can read specific sections of the passage more closely as needed to answer questions about smaller details.

Method 2: Skip Straight to the Questions

If you think skipping the passage altogether can be an effective initial strategy, you should answer questions about small details in the passage first, so you end up reading a bit of the passage while answering questions. Then, when you move on to main idea questions later, you will already have a solid sense of the message of the passage as a whole.

Method 3: Read the Passage in Full

If you are both a quick and thorough reader, you might be able to pull this off without any problems. Just make sure it?¡¥s not slowing you down.

If you are reading this way and find you can save a few minutes (and not lose any points) by using one of the other methods, then you should do that instead. It is always better to have extra time at the end so you can double-check your answers!

Tip 4: Get Interested in the Passages

If you want to retain information as you are reading passages on the GATE/ASET, the best way to do it is to force yourself to engage with the material. Treat this as a learning experience, not a chore, and you will find it much easier to remember what happened in the passage. If your brain is in 'wow, interesting' mode rather than 'blah, blah, just have to get to the questions' mode, you will have a more pleasant experience on the test and a better time answering the questions overall.

Tip 5: Look for Direct Evidence

Though questions on GATE/ASET reading may sometimes seem subjective, the reality is that you should always be able to find direct evidence in the passage or chart you are referencing to support your answers.

Even inference questions, which ask you to look beyond the literal facts in the passage, will be backed up by logical deductions that can be made from the evidence that is presented. For inference questiosn especially, you might end up looking beyond the sentence referenced in the question to find the evidence you need. But the evidence is always in there somewhere!

If you are thinking about choosing an answer that seems like it could be correct, but you can not find any evidence for it, hold off. Any answer that can not be backed up by specific information in the passage has to be incorrect.

Tip 6: PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE!

We say this in pretty much all of our GATE/ASET test advice posts, but the reason we repeat it so frequently is because the GATE/ASET test is one of those tests where the best preparation is the test itself. Second to that, practice tests are the most fool-proof preparation there is for a test that measures almost as much test-taking strategy as it does content and skill.

Start by taking practice tests, one section at a time. Identify your weaknesses and work to improve in those areas. Gradually, as your skills grow, begin to take each section of the test with time constraints. And finally, take a few complete practice tests under testing conditions as similar to test day as possible.   

Six Most Effective GATE/ASET Tips and Tricks That You Must Use

posted Jan 22, 2019, 3:08 AM by Adam Yu   [ updated Feb 13, 2019, 5:20 PM ]

Studying for GATE/ASET is a big undertaking, and you might not know where to start. A good way to get yourself into gear is to learn about the structure of the test and different ways you can adapt your strategy to improve on each section. In this article, you will be provided with some most effective tips and tricks that you should be using to get your best scores ever.

Tip 1: Eliminate 3 Wrong Answers

The most important rule to remember that there is only one correct answer for each question, and you should be able to eliminate all the others. This means that your number one strategy on the test is process of elimination. If you're struggling with a question, try to find reasons to rule out most of the answers rather than reasons why certain options could work.

Learn to be extremely picky about which answers to eliminate.  If a question seems subjective, keep reminding yourself that it is an illusion. All incorrect choices are incorrect for good reasons, and it is your job to find those reasons until you narrow your answers down to one possibility.

Tip 2: Always Understand Your Mistakes

This is vital if you want to see dramatic improvements. If you take the time to understand each mistake you make on practice questions, why you made it, and what you will do to avoid it in the future, you are virtually guaranteed a good score on the test.

Mistakes usually fall into one of four categories:

#1: Content weakness
#2: Time pressure
#3: Question comprehension issue
#4: Careless error

After you finish a practice test, catalog all the questions you answer incorrectly so you can work on detecting error patterns. Did you consistently answer a particular type of math question wrong (content weakness)? Did you keep missing the words except or least (careless error) in questions? Did you consistently miss questions at the end of sections (time pressure)?

Whatever your issues, you have to understand them completely so you can fix the problems you are having and see positive changes in your scores!

Tip 3: (Maths) Focus on Filling Content Gaps First

If you have problems with basic math skills, it does not matter how many practice questions you do?ayou are going to have to fix those knowlege gaps before you can improve your Math score.

If you notice you are missing practice questions because you are uncomfortable in a certain content area, work on your content weaknesses before you do anything else. This is the fastest way to improve your scores dramatically. You can go from here to fix other types of mistakes that are more surface-level (such as reading questions wrong or basic carelessness).

Tip 4: (Maths) Re-Solve Questions You Missed Before Looking at the Answer Explanations

This is the best way to make sure you truly understand how to solve questions you initially messed up on the Maths section. It is one thing to read the answer explanation and say 'oh, of course, that is how you solve it,' but it is a completely different matter to work out the problem yourself.

The process will stick in your mind much better if you go through it, rather than if you just read about it. Look at what the correct answer choice should be and try to get there yourself before you read the explanation.

Tip 5: (Maths) Underline Key Parts of the Question

You should use this tip on the math section if you've been missing questions by accidentally solving for the wrong value. Underline what you need to find in the question so you do not get confused during the calculation process.

Sometimes questions ask you to solve for a value that necessitates solving for something else along the way. That something else will often be one of the incorrect answer choices. Many students accidentally pick the trick answer choice because they lose track of the value that they were originally supposed to find. You can avoid this by underlining relevant parts of the question to maintain your focus.

Tip 6: PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE!

We say this in pretty much all of our GATE/ASET test advice posts, but the reason we repeat it so frequently is because the GATE/ASET test is one of those tests where the best preparation is the test itself. Second to that, practice tests are the most fool-proof preparation there is for a test that measures almost as much test-taking strategy as it does content and skill.

Start by taking practice tests, one section at a time. Identify your weaknesses and work to improve in those areas. Gradually, as your skills grow, begin to take each section of the test with time constraints. And finally, take a few complete practice tests under testing conditions as similar to test day as possible.   

5 Ways to Turn Mistakes Into Valuable Lessons When Preparing for GATE/ASET Test

posted Jan 17, 2019, 12:03 AM by Adam Yu   [ updated Jan 22, 2019, 3:09 AM ]

In the previous post "Learn From Your Mistakes For GATE/ASET Test", we have listed out 4 categories of mistakes you could make when you prepare yourself for GATE/ASET test, they are:

Time Issue: You were pressed for time.

Question Comprehension Issue: The question was too complicated, you were not exactly sure what it was asking, or you were tricked by the question.

Procedural/Content Issue: You did not know how to find the answer to the question, or did not know the material the question covered.

Careless Error: A.k.a. careless mistakes, a.k.a. stupid mistakes, a.k.a. the most frustrating mistakes of all.

Okay, you know everything now about what you were doing wrong with your reviewing of missed questions. How can you make it more efficient (and effective) in the future?

There are a few tips:

1. When going through practice tests, always mark the questions you think you have a 3/4 or less chance of getting correct. Circling the numbers of the questions works well for me, because you can circle them lightly on your first time through the test, and circle ones you are still unsure of more heavily on your second time through. This way, you can review everything you were unsure about, even if you ended up getting them right. Knowing you have looked over everything you were unsure about, even if you ended up getting the question correct, will make you more confident you are choosing the right answer in the future, because you will have put in the time.

2. Just like a tooth with a cavity, the best way to get better is to...PRACTICE!

I have no regrets about this wordplay. I am also 100% serious. Practice makes perfect, and it does make answering the questions you have trouble with more routine, which in turn can get you closer to perfection. See also my earlier explanation for why you should structure your practice.

3. Do not immediately go back and try to re-do missed questions (or if you do, do not let that be the only time you re-do them). It is more helpful to let some time pass in between attempts - a day is usually good enough, but anywhere between few hours or a week can also work, depending on the person - because then you can try it again fresh.

4. Keep a notebook or computer record of questions you got wrong, sorted by subject and question subtype. Note for each question why you missed it and how you plan to remedy this in the future.

Reviewing questions you got wrong is integral to effective test prep. Learning from mistakes is not just a saying - it reflects the reality that can help you break through a score ceiling and drastically improve your score on the exam. The trick is to know not just where you are making mistakes, but to practice those same types of questions over and over until you have mastered them.

5. PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE!

We say this in pretty much all of our GATE/ASET test advice posts, but the reason we repeat it so frequently is because the GATE/ASET test is one of those tests where the best preparation is the test itself. Second to that, practice tests are the most fool-proof preparation there is for a test that measures almost as much test-taking strategy as it does content and skill.

Start by taking practice tests, one section at a time. Identify your weaknesses and work to improve in those areas. Gradually, as your skills grow, begin to take each section of the test with time constraints. And finally, take a few complete practice tests under testing conditions as similar to test day as possible. 

Learn From Your Mistakes For GATE/ASET Test

posted Jan 8, 2019, 12:20 AM by Adam Yu   [ updated Jan 17, 2019, 12:04 AM ]

What do you do when you have been preparing tirelessly for the GATE/ASET test, sit down to take a practice test...and then have to face all the questions you missed? This article lists the best ways to grapple with missed questions when you prepare yourself for GATE/ASET test.

1. Common Reactions to Mistakes

Getting questions wrong on an GATE/ASET practice test can be anywhere from mildly disappointing to absolutely infuriating. Discovering that you have answered a question incorrectly can trigger any or all of the following impulses:

Impulse 1: Focusing on what you did well and ignoring what you did wrong (not helpful).

Impulse 2: Disregarding questions you got wrong because they were just "careless mistakes" (not helpful).

Impulse 3: Focusing on the fact that you got things wrong and ignoring review in favor of self-loathing (not helpful).

Reviewing the questions you missed, however, is an extremely important part of test prep. It is the point at which you switch over from merely practice to actually teaching yourself.

2. Strategy One: Analyze Your Confidence for Each Question

It is not only important that you review missed questions, but that you also review them effectively. A helpful way to do this is by going through the questions you messed up on and sorting them into categories.

Many times, questions can be sorted into these general categories: Skipped (guessed randomly on), Guessed (through elimination), and (thought you) Knew. Seeing how many questions you skipped, how many you guessed, and how many you were certain were correct can help to focus your studying.

For instance, if the majority of the questions you missed were ones you skipped answering, it is possible that you might be accidentally skipping over some questions because you are rushing and end up zipping right past them.

Once you have sorted the questions you missed into these general categories, make sure to review all of the questions you guessed on, including the ones you answered correctly. Compare these questions with the questions you guessed incorrectly on. Was it just blind luck, or is there a difference between the way you approached the guessed questions you got correctly and incorrectly?

3. Strategy Two: Understand the Reason for Missing Each Question

Sort the questions by the fundamental reason you missed them. Do not just think, "Well, I got that one wrong." That is not useful in figuring out where you are really making mistakes.

Nearly all mistakes fall into following four categories:

Time Issue: You were pressed for time.

Question Comprehension Issue: The question was too complicated, you were not exactly sure what it was asking, or you were tricked by the question.

Procedural/Content Issue: You did not know how to find the answer to the question, or did not know the material the question covered.

Careless Error: A.k.a. careless mistakes, a.k.a. stupid mistakes, a.k.a. the most frustrating mistakes of all.

4. Mistake Type #1: Time Crunch

These are questions where you were pressed for time and could not answer the question. This is often the case with skipped or incorrectly guessed questions. Out of all the questions you missed, how many of these "ran out of time" questions are there? If the majority of your missed questions happened because you were running low on time, you may have a time management issue and you need to improve your time management skills.

5. Mistake Type #2: Question Comprehension

GATE/ASET questions might need to have one unambiguous answer, but that does not mean that they can not trick you with the wording of the question. Oddly, this is especially lethal for those who read quickly, because it can lead you to focus on the wrong part of the question. Always make sure you know what the question is asking before you look at the answers. Often, the test will give several incorrect answer choices that each could be correct if you misread the question a particular way.

6. Mistake Type #3: Procedural/Content Issue

If it is a multiple choice question, identify what type of question it is. For these kinds of missed questions, there is a main step to take which is to practice answering questions, over and over and over and more importantly, reviewing them well.

7. Mistake Type #4: Careless Error

Careless errors are seemingly innocuous, but with a potentially fatal impact. Rushing headlong through answer choices (or problem solving, in the case of some math questions) is often the prime culprit for careless mistakes. This is completely understandable, as you are taking a timed test, but ultimately it can be counterproductive if you do not have the appropriate backups in place.

We will discuss about each of these mistake types and strategies to improve on them in greater details in the next a few posts. 

8. PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE!

We say this in pretty much all of our GATE/ASET test advice posts, but the reason we repeat it so frequently is because the GATE/ASET test is one of those tests where the best preparation is the test itself. Second to that, practice tests are the most fool-proof preparation there is for a test that measures almost as much test-taking strategy as it does content and skill.

Start by taking practice tests, one section at a time. Identify your weaknesses and work to improve in those areas. Gradually, as your skills grow, begin to take each section of the test with time constraints. And finally, take a few complete practice tests under testing conditions as similar to test day as possible.   

Make GATE/ASET Test Prep Your Summer Focus

posted Jan 1, 2019, 7:54 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Jan 8, 2019, 12:21 AM ]

To many students, summer is a break from the normal frenzy of academia. After the juggling of school work, test prep, extracurricular activities, and social events, you may feel as though you have earned a break. And you are probably right, but that does not mean you will spend your summer kicking up your feet at the beach.

Whether you spend your summer working, taking summer classes, or attending a summer program, odds are that your summer schedule varies dramatically from the one you keep during the school year. To many students, this means that test prep can take a back seat in favor of more relaxing or exciting activities. In this post, we outline how to integrate GATE/ASET prep with your summer plans so that you are ready to hit the ground running when GATE/ASET test is just a few weeks away.

1. Make a Plan

You are more likely to study when you have committed yourself to a specific plan in advance. When summer break starts, take the time to sit down with a calendar and outline your study plan.

First of all, know your weakness, while your school academic report will indicate which subjects are most in need of improvement, they will not reveal the specific kinds of error to which you are most susceptible. The easiest way to reveal this is by taking a practice GATE/ASET test and evaluating its results carefully.

Now start with the big picture. You have roughly 7 weeks in your summer break. If you are aiming for 30 hours of study time per month, that comes down to roughly four or five hours per week. Break it down even further. Do you want weekends off? If so, that will be about one hour per day during the week. If you want to take the weekdays off and double-up your study time on the weekends, that is about two hours per day on Saturdays and Sundays.

This might sound like a lot but there are plenty of ways to integrate studying into your daily life, making it easier and more efficient.

2. Use Time Saving Hacks to Maximize Study Time

Think of all your down time during an average day. There is time spent waiting in check out lines, offices, or before meals. Time spent on a lunch break or waiting to fall to sleep. Keep some simple study materials on hand to maximize all these gaps.

Get a vocabulary app to help build your vocabulary, play math games or other test prep apps on your phone or computer. Get access to online practice questions so that you have them on hand at any moment. When you will fill you empty time with strategic study strikes, you maximize your study total over the long term.

3. Make It Fun!

It is summer. You probably do not want to get weighed down in formal test prep classes day in and day out. And even if you do, studying is probably the last thing you want to do when class lets out. Luckily there are plenty of low key ways to bolster your knowledge for the test.

Read high quality literature. Read journal articles in publications. Keep up on current events. Try to read a broad variety of material to prepare for the types of excerpts commonly included on the GATE/ASET Reading section.

Also get into puzzles. Math puzzles like sudoku or word puzzles like crosswords are fun ways to stretch your mind. Bring scrabble, a dictionary, and a blanket to the park with friends. Studying does not have to be all business; this is summer after all!

4. Learn Key Strategies

There are a few key strategies for preparing GATE/ASET test. Some of them are best suited for students challenged by time management, others are best suited for students who struggle with content knowledge, and still others are for students who have trouble applying their knowledge in new ways.

It is difficult to recommend specific strategies to every student. Instead, we recommend that you review our comprehensive collection of test strategies, identify which help you to perform the best, and focus on applying them further.

We have outlined some key strategies and we encourage you to spend some time this summer becoming familiar with each and learning which work the best for you.

5. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

We say this in pretty much all of our GATE/ASET test advice posts, but the reason we repeat it so frequently is because the GATE/ASET test is one of those tests where the best preparation is the test itself. Second to that, practice tests are the most fool-proof preparation there is for a test that measures almost as much test-taking strategy as it does content and skill.

Start by taking practice tests, one section at a time. Identify your weaknesses and work to improve in those areas. Gradually, as your skills grow, begin to take each section of the test with time constraints. And finally, take a few complete practice tests under testing conditions as similar to test day as possible.   

4 Helpful Tips for Preparing GATE/ASET Test During School Holidays

posted Dec 9, 2018, 10:37 PM by Adam Yu

#1: Make a Study Plan

To keep up your motivation, make yourself a holiday study plan and stick to it. Plan out to the day and week how much time you will spend studying and how often you will be taking the GATE/ASET practice tests.

You can be flexible if you find you are progressing faster or slower than you expected, but try to stick to your study plan as much as possible.

By planning ahead of time, you will also be able to do things like adjust for mandatory family vacations or other holiday activities.

Learn how much you need to improve, and review your mistakes with the GATE/ASET practice tests. You should also use the tips in this article about getting a satisfactory score on the GATE/ASET practice tests to keep up your motivation.

#2: Target Your Weak Areas

To keep your skills honed, you will need to regularly practice skills you struggle with. Before you start your holiday studying, take a full-length practice test, note what you had problems with, and plan your studying accordingly.

For instance, let us say you took a practice test and did fine on Math but struggled with the Reading section. When plan your studying, you will need to make sure that you are regularly drilling yourself on Reading passages and reading GATE/ASET practice materials. 

#3: Consider a Holiday GATE/ASET Test Prep Course

Think about doing a Holiday GATE/ASET Test Bootcamp course in this holiday to give you more structure in your studying.

It is no fun to have to give up part or all of your holiday for GATE/ASET test prep, but if you can get a great score on the BIG DAY in a few weeks time then you will be done with the test forever.

#4: Do not Burn Yourself Out

If you get to the end of the school year and you are brain-dead because of how hard you have been working, give yourself a break.

Immediately diving into GATE/ASET test prep when you no longer care about anything schoolwork related is a recipe for disaster. Instead, give yourself a set amount of time to relax and reboot. It would be better to spend a week or two at the beginning of the holiday building up your motivation than to force yourself straight into GATE/ASET test prep and see no score improvement.

Avoiding burning yourself out also means not creating a too ambitious holiday GATE/ASET test prep schedule. Do not expect that you can study for ten hours a day for months on end and continue to have high-quality studying time.

Know your own studying strengths and weaknesses and create a study plan that plays to your strengths and minimizes your weaknesses. For example, if you know you can only concentrate for about 45 minutes at a time, build in breaks to your study sessions so that you can concentrate absolutely for those 45 minutes, confident that you will have time to take a break once that sprint is over.   

Best Creative Writing Techniques for WA GATE/ASET Test

posted Dec 9, 2018, 10:34 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Jan 1, 2019, 7:55 PM ]

Looking for best creative writing techniques for your kids? You have come to the right place. The following guidance will prepare your kids and boost their scores.

1. Plot Planning

Firstly, ask your child where the story is going to take place. It could be somewhere fictional or real, it could be a planet, a country, a town or a house or anywhere!

Then, ask when the story is taking place, now? In the future? In the past?

Finally ask what they think is going to happen. Remember that this does not have to be accurate and they do not have to stick to what they say; many of the best writers say that their plots develop organically as they write. If they do have a firm idea of where they want to go with the plot, though, they can create an outline by completing a story planner, which could look something like this:

  • First ...
  • Then ...
  • Next ...
  • And finally ...

2. Characterisation
Ask your child who is going to be in the story. How do they want their readers to feel about each character? Again, they may want to jot some ideas down. You could make a table for them to help them organise their thoughts, with these headings:

  • Name of character
  • Relationship to other characters
  • What he/she looks like
  • Behaviour

3. Story Language 
Ask your child to think of some fabulous words to use in their story writing. They might be long words or simple ones, or they might be great descriptive words or words that help create pace and tension. Encourage them to jot these down and refer to the list as they write their story.

4. Story Starters 
All writers know that you have got to capture the attention of your readers right from the start; you want to make them desperate to read on. Ask your child to think of some good story openers that will entice people to find out more. Here are a few examples:

First sentences that are mysterious?-
Molly had no sense of the day that lay ahead.

Story starters that use language tricks like alliteration?-
It was damp, dark and dreadfully dusty when Molly entered the house.

Story openers that create tension?-
Molly could hear her heart beating faster than ever before. Could this really be happening?

Stories that go straight into dialogue?-
"But I do not want to go to school, Mummy, " groaned Molly.

Encourage your child to look at some of the books they like to read and see how they begin in order to offer inspiration.

5. Get Writing!
Once they have got all of these ideas in place, they can start writing. They could do a draft in the first instance and then a neat, polished version later. They may wish to write in short chapters, use illustrations, or make their own book to write in, let them use their imagination and creativity when it comes to presentation, and make sure you show how much you value the end product by keeping it to read again with the other books in your house.

How To Get Ready For the GATE/ASET Test?

posted Nov 5, 2018, 6:58 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Dec 9, 2018, 10:35 PM ]

Many students do not realize that while the GATE/ASET Test is wholly unique, it is not unconquerable. Admittedly, it is not like your regular school test, but the same strategies that help in general academic subjects are easily transferable to the GATE/ASET Test. 

Here is what you should do:

Eight months before

In an ideal world, you would have been studying for an hour each night, every night for a few months. Let us be honest, though: we are all busy, and a significant number of students do not have an extra hour to devote to studying for a test which is still a few months away. However, test-taking sites and preparation courses recommend getting a start on studying pretty far-out, and I would agree that that is a smart move.

Remember, the GATE/ASET Test will be composed of sections you already know and have been studying already. Each section must be completed in a timed setting. When you are thinking of a study strategy that work for you, that means looking at a particular subject in depth, or taking online practice tests.

Do you do best on tests by memorizing ideas? Feel free to do that with the GATE/ASET Test. Do you find success by utilizing already available, outside resources? There is a great wealth of test prep materials available on Aussin Education website! Your strategy is to familiarize yourself with the format of the GATE/ASET Test. Choose studying methods that already work for you and get a head start that is comfortable for you.

The night before

The night before the test is when you should give yourself a break from thinking about the test. Go to bed and get a healthy 9 to 10 hours of sleep; make sure the hour before you sleep is spent doing something relaxing like reading a book.

Do not spend the night before the test cramming. Having a strong and rested brain is infinitely more important than anything else you might shove into your head the night before. This is a hygienic skill you may already have practised for regular school tests, and it is just as helpful for the GATE/ASET Test as it is for daily life. 

The morning of the test

You wake up. Now what? Go through your normal routine, and make sure you get a full, healthy breakfast. The point is, give yourself some of those real, nutritious foods that will wake your brain up and keep it active during the test.

Pop, energy drinks, and sugary pastries are not such a good idea. They will wake you up, but they will give you a sugar crash halfway through the test?anot the ideal result. I would also recommend doing some reading as you wake up: get your mind working and prepared for the large amounts of thinking you will have to do later.

After the test

Relax! You just took the GATE/ASET Test, and if you have made healthy choices and did some preparation ahead of time, you likely did better than you expected. It is behind you now, so de-stress and calmly await your scores. Recognize that no matter what you get, the GATE/ASET Test is just one test and one small part of your life.

You will find that the GATE/ASET Test will not traumatize you, nor is it unconquerable.  All you have to do is transfer strategies that are already helpful for everyday life to the test. When you are healthy and prepared, it can even be fun to test your brain and try and crack the GATE/ASET Test. 

5 Great Ways to Prepare for the GATE/ASET Test

posted Oct 29, 2018, 11:15 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Nov 5, 2018, 6:58 PM ]

GATE/ASET Test season is in full swing! Although studying for the GATE/ASET Test is considered a difficult and stressful tasks, with dedication and the right mindset, anything is possible. Here are some tips on how to really prepare for the GATE/ASET Test in order to get the best score possible.

1. Get motivated

Studying for the GATE/ASET Test correctly is all about having the right mindset. If you start your studying with a negative and lazy attitude, it will be difficult to get started and stay dedicated. By thinking of the GATE/ASET Test as a ticket to your dream school  (rather than just a big, scary test you are forced to take), you can motivate yourself to put in 100% of your time and effort into successfully preparing for the GATE/ASET Test.

2. Set a score goal and make a study schedule

Setting a score goal ties into getting motivated; if you have a specific score you’re looking to achieve, you can judge the time frame needed to prepare for this score. Researching different schools and their admission scores can help you set a score goal if you’re having trouble figuring out a realistic one.

As many students already know, the GATE/ASET Test is an extremely demanding thing to prepare for. You really need to show dedication and time management to reach your goals. Setting up a schedule that dictates what days and how many hours you will dedicate to studying can help you become more organized and achieve your goal score. The amount of time you dedicate to studying depends on your own preferences and how much time there is until your scheduled test date, but it is important to stay consistent with your studying. If you plan on studying for two hours after school and a couple more hours on the weekend, you should keep up with that schedule the entire time you prepare for the GATE/ASET Test. If you make studying into a habit, you will definitely see a score improvement!

3. Utilize test prep books, courses, or other resources  

Everyone has different study habits, skills, and strengths. In order to successfully prepare for the GATE/ASET Test, you must discover your strengths, weaknesses, and your preferred study methods and resources. There are many GATE/ASET Test prep resources available for studying, including the high-quality GATE/ASET Test Online Practice Packages from Aussin Education. These resources are very helpful for individual self-prep and practice tests. Another way to study is taking prep courses: there are online self-paced courses, private tutors, and many different prep classes taught at schools or private businesses. Your success depends on what kind of studier you are; some courses are more demanding and strict than others. In order to pick a course, do some research! Ask friends who have gotten high scores what they used to study or look online. There are many resources available concerning test prep, so find what works for you.

4. Learn test strategies

In order to prepare for the GATE/ASET Test, you must learn different strategies on how to approach questions during the test. There are four major sections on the GATE/ASET Test and each section has a certain style of asking questions and a time limit to answer those questions. To really succeed during the test, you need to learn the best strategies on managing time, eliminating answers, and guessing, as well as section-specific tips and tricks. The fact that you are tested on so much information may seem overwhelming, but you are in luck; prep courses and prep books, as well as the internet, offer many different strategies and tips that can help you practice and teach you how to answer questions on the GATE/ASET Test.

5. Practice, practice, practice

Like everything in life, prepping for the GATE/ASET Test is what you make of it. When it comes down to it, you and only you can dedicate the necessary time to studying and practicing. This may sound like your mom lecturing you, but by sticking to your study schedule and practicing enough, you will truly get what you put into it.

By following these rules, you can become more prepared for the process of studying for the GATE/ASET Test. With hard work and dedication, achieving a great score is possible! Good luck to everyone taking it in the near future. Remember: you got this!

How to Score High Marks in GATE/ASET Test?

posted Oct 18, 2018, 10:21 PM by Adam Yu   [ updated Oct 29, 2018, 11:17 PM ]

Does your child score excellent marks in his/her classroom but score fewer marks in a competitve testing environment?

To be successful in any examination, students need the self-confidence to achieve target. a consistently focused study and successful strategies to succeed in an examination.

(1) Boost up self-confidence

Students can boost up self-confidence by reminding themselves that they have studied and gained the knowledge related to all the concepts tested in the test. Questions they can ask themselves are "Am I performing excellently in my classroom?" or "Am I devoting sufficient time to testing my knowledge gained in the school?". Be positive and believe in the ability to achieve the target in the test.

(2) Develop concentration

Concentration can be developed by stopping mind wondering and stopping to think about the outcome of the effort spent. Always be optimistic and think about the positive result. Exercising, healthy diet and complete sleep of eight hours will make brain fresh and energetic. Find a peaceful place either the library or in a home away from TV, phone or computer games. Take a five minutes break after one hour of study.

(3) Prepare for the examination

Always study the essential topics first and try to understand the subject matter. Create a mind map of the problem. Do not hesitate to take help from parents, friends or teachers if there is no clear understanding the concept or topic. Analyse the exam pattern and practice some online papers.

During examinations carefully read and follow all the instruction given in the test paper. Do not overestimate and do not underestimate the exam paper, always remember that every candidate gets the same exam paper. If the exam paper is easy, then it is easy for everyone, and if it is difficult, then it is difficult for everyone. Do not spend too much time on one particular question. If confused and stuck in between then mark that question to come back if time permit and jump to another question.

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